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‘Mortal Kombat In Real Life’ Pits An Ordinary Youth Against Outworld’s Worst
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Tom Teller, a self-described “high school student with a passion for film,” creates videos based around video games and visual effects applied to real-life situations through his production shingle Intellergence. For his latest creation Teller ponders a question that must have been on all our minds at some point in time: what if while we’re out walking we’re suddenly thrown into the thick of battle with the supernaturally-powered fighters from the mega-popular Mortal Kombat video game franchise?

You can watch the “Mortal Kombat in Real Life” video here below.

Armed with only a wooden stick for a weapon our hero must dislodge himself from his cell phone for a few moments and fight his way through an array of digitized adversaries. It’s a pretty well-choreographed clip that any fan of the Mortal Kombat games will get a kick out of. I just wish the “finishing moves” were bloodier and gorier. But I shouldn’t complain — this kid is way better at this than most of us.

You can view more of Tom’s videos at the Intellergence YouTube channel.

Video

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